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Need to Understand What Commerce Is?

Need to Understand What Commerce Is?

The term “commerce” is widely used and may be frequently encountered in the course of a person’s life, as generally being applied to economic transactions and activities dealing with finances in a number of forms. Commerce, which may also be referred to as commercial activities, has to do with the transfer of goods, as might be understood as the initial “life cycle” of a product.
People referring to business activities have long referred to the joint phrase of “commerce and industry,” with industry being the original creation, collection, or other kind of act which makes the product or service then available as an item of commerce.
Imbuing a product with the quality of being commercial can thus be understood in some cases as an action preceding that of commerce, in which the good is passed from the person who made or found it to the person who wishes to use it and is willing to pay a fee or render some other service in exchange.
Commercial activities have long been observed as a widespread aspect of human civilizations, though modern commerce, in terms of the dominant model for economic activities over the last few hundred years, have depended on currency as the motivator for commerce to take place, rather than barter-based systems.
Commerce is commonly phrased according to two basic models. A commercial transaction might be represented in terms of the good or service travelling from the person who creates it to the person who uses it. Alternately, commerce can be pictured, without the human participants, as the journey from origin to consumption.

A Brief History of E-Commerce

A Brief History of E-Commerce

The history of e-commerce has continued up to the present day but is generally considered to also predate the period in which the Internet was available. Before personal computers had been introduced which could be used practically and relatively inexpensively by a wide range of consumers for Internet commerce, the history of e-commerce turned on technology which was used between different businesses which had the funds to use them, rather than between consumers and businesses.
The history of e-commerce includes the aspect of OS commerce, or open source commerce, as can be used freely by an array of people. In this regard, the late 1970s saw the development, prior to anything resembling Internet commerce, of methods for businesses to process their transactions with each other using electronic means.
Strictly speaking, a range of the technologically-driven innovations of the 1980s, such as ATMs, can also be considered as parts of the history of e-commerce, albeit one without the same access to computing on the part of consumers as was enjoyed by the large businesses serving them.
The modern phase of e-commerce was marked by a shift to a more open source, os commerce approach, as began with the 1990 creation of a web browser for searching the World Wide Web, though Internet commerce as such only became allowable in 1991. Moreover, OS commerce of this kind only became somewhat feasible with the Internet’s burst of popularity in 1994, and Internet commerce had become fairly widespread as a business model as of 2000.

What Does the Commerce Clause Mean?

What Does the Commerce Clause Mean?

The Commerce Clause is an important aspect of the United States Constitution and, in particular, a source of the scope and limits of the Federal Government’s power to regulate the economic activity of the United States. The Commerce Clause consists specifically of Article 1, Section 8, Clause 3 of the document.
In light of disagreements about the practical and philosophical approach of Presidential administration and Federal agencies toward commercial and industrial regulation, media figures, political commentators and economists often discuss the meaning and correct interpretation of the Commerce Clause in public discussions of and debates over economic policy.
According to the Commerce Clause, the U.S. Government can “regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes.” These three listed powers tend to be divided into the Foreign Commerce Clause, the Interstate Commerce Clause, and the Indian Commerce Clause, respectively. In this regard, widely based discussion of the Commerce Clause most often turns on the second component of the Interstate Commerce Clause, less often on the first of the Foreign Commerce Clause, and very rarely of the third Foreign Commerce Clause.
In American discussions of and decisions on this element of Constitutional interpretation, the latitude granted to so-called Commerce Clause powers is often connected to the political persuasion of an individual, with the American liberal/left interpreting the Commerce Clause more permissively and the conservative right interpreting the Commerce Clause less broadly. The first tendency typified the New Deal Era in American judicial decisions, and the second the Rehnquist Court’s conservative approach to jurisprudence.

The United States Department of Commerce

The United States Department of Commerce

The US Department of Commerce, as administered by the Presidentially-appointed Secretary of Commerce, is an aspect of the United States Government devoted to the promotion and oversight of economic activities and commercial transactions throughout the country. The Commerce Department can be traced back in American governmental history to a government section originally known as the United States Department of Commerce and Labor, which was created in 1903 and later split in 1913 into two US Government departments devoted to the two respective areas.
The US Department of Commerce is currently housed in the Herbert C. Hoover Building located on Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C. The current Secretary of Commerce is Gary Locke, a one-time Governor of Washington.
Among the various tasks and organizational divisions of the US Government included as responsibilities of the Commerce Department, some are the Patent and Trademark Office and the National Weather Service. In addition, the Secretary of Commerce administers such US Department of Commerce sections as the International Trade Administration, the Minority Business Development Agency, the Economics and Statistics Administration, and the Bureau of Industry and Security.
The US Department of Commerce can be located for queries and concerns on the Internet at www.commerce.gov. As of 2010, the Commerce Department was found to employ some 141,885 working under the oversight of Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke, while its estimated operating budget for that year was placed at $14.2 billion, against the $10.2 billion used for the US Department of Commerce during the period of the previous year.

Use Your Mobile Device for Mobile Commerce

Use Your Mobile Device for Mobile Commerce

The concept of Mobile Commerce, also referred to as M Commerce, refers to commercial transactions which take place through the medium of a mobile communication device like a cell phone or some other kind of widely available device. According to the widely used M commerce definition, this kind of activity can involve the mobile device in question and of whatever kind is specifically in use being used either to initiate or complete, if not both, the commercial transaction at issue.
Mobile commerce can be traced back as a practice to Helsinki, Finland in 1999. At this point, M commerce was created specifically as a capability for soda vending machines, which could have payment made to them through text messages sent on mobile phones. As a subject for enterprise and study, M commerce was formally conceived and pursued as a practice in the next few years.
Initially, mobile commerce was most noticeably based in the SMS capacity for mobile phone text messaging. As M commerce has come to assume a more financially significant area of the overall category for electronic commerce, communications companies have made efforts toward developing applications for M commerce independent of SMS activities.
As of 2010, a wide range of functions had been made available to mobile commerce. In this regard, people can use M commerce functions for bidding in auctions, purchasing items listed in catalogs, and making transactions in the stock market. Mobile commerce has also been extended toward delivering current and updated information on topics like current affairs and sports.

Fast Facts About the Commerce Commission

Fast Facts About the Commerce Commission

The Commerce Commission of the United States Government is formally referred to as the Senate Commerce Committee. In this regard, the Commerce Commission is included in the larger body of the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
Among the various tasks of the Senate Commerce Committee, the elected representatives currently sitting on the Commerce Commission are responsible for the supervision of the powers for regulation and oversight of Interstate commerce as are granted to the United States Federal Government through the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution.
At one point in United States Government history, there was also a section of the Federal Government, outside of Congress, in the form of a regulatory agency formally referred to as the Interstate Commerce Commission. These powers were left largely to the Senate Commerce Committee following the 1995 abolition of the Interstate Commerce Commission, which had the responsibility for its actual activities to the Surface Transportation Board.
The Senate Commerce Committee, considered as a whole and apart from its Commerce Commission functions, includes the subcommittees for Communications, Technology, Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security; the Internet; Competitiveness, Innovation, and Expert Promotion; Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance; Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard; Science and Space; and Surface Transportation and Merchant Maine Infrastructure, Safety and Security.
As of 2010, the Senate Commerce Committee was headed by Jay Rockefeller, a West Virginia Democrat, while the highest-ranking Republican in the Congressional Commerce Commission was Texas’s Kay Bailey, with other prominent members including Barbara Boxer, John Kerry, and Sam Brownback.